Kekoolani Genealogy of the Descendants of the Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii


Living [Parents]

Kahula 1, 2, 3. married 4 Living.

Other marriages:
Kanakaole (Kanakaole I, Kanakole-a-Mukoi, Kanakaole Makaoi),

They had the following children:

  F i Living
  M ii Living
  M iii Living

Mukoi (Makaoi) 1, 2 was born about 1806 in Keokea, Hawaii, Hawaii. He died about 1898. He married Kapapuni.

Other marriages:
Naholowaa,

Kapapuni. married Mukoi (Makaoi).


Living [Parents]

Living

They had the following children:

  M i Piliwale (Chief of Kukaniloko, Lihue, Oahu, Ruing Chief of Ewa)
  F ii Living
  M iii Lo-Lale (Lō-Lale. Lō-Lele, Lōlele, Lōlale, Lali, Olali) (Lō Chief of Halona)

Living [Parents]

Living

They had the following children:

  M i Living
  M ii Kalamakua (Kalamakua-a-Kaipuholua) (Chief of Halawa, O'ahu)

Living [Parents]

Living [Parents]

Other marriages:
Kukalohe,

They had the following children:

  F i Moana (Moana-wahine, Moana-o-Kauhiahaki) (High Priestess)
  M ii Living
  M iii Living
  M iv Living
  M v Living

Kukalohe [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4. married 5 Living.

Other marriages:
Moana (Moana-wahine, Moana-o-Kauhiahaki), (High Priestess)

From Solomon Pelioholani:
Kauakahiakua (k); born were Holoae (k), Pinea (w) Kukalohe (k), third husband of Moana, Kaukoko (k), father of Kekuhaupio, the warrior.

Living [Parents]

Other marriages:
Living

They had the following children:

  M i Living

Living [Parents]

Kala'aiheana Kihawahine (Kala'aiheana I, Kala-'ai-heana, Kaleiheana) (Mo'o Chiefess) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.(Mo'o married Living.

Kihawahine Mokuhinia Kalama’ula Kala’aiheana

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Ka-la-'ai-heana is the name given to this 4th child of Piilani and Laieleholeho by SM Kamakau.

This Maui chiefess, Kala-'ai-heana, became diefied after her death as a type of reptile goddesss (lizard ) known as as a "mo'o", her name as the mo'o entity was "Kihawahine".

According to P. Christiaan Klieger, Kihawahine lived long enough to mate and have a child, Nihoa Kamalama, with Kamalama. King Kalakaua and Queen Lili’uokalani claimed to be descendents of Kihawahine through her granddaughter, Maluna.


FORNANDER:
"Piilani's children with Laielohelohe were Lono-a-Pii, who succeeded him as Moi of Maui; Kiha-a-Piilani, who was brought up to the age of manhood among his mother's relatives on Oahu ; the daughter Piikea, just referred to ; and another daughter, Kalaaiheana, of whom no further mention occurs."


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KIWAHINE (MO'O GODDESS)
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By WAIHILI (2010)

“Hawaiians believed that all things--’animate and inanimate, objects and creatures’--are interrelated by the all pervading creative force: mana, the divine power of the gods.” - George Hu’eu Sanford Kanahele, Ku Kanaka

Mo’o are the powerful lizard (or dragon) water spirits of Hawai’i. Mo’o inhabit waterfalls, fishponds, even the ocean. In the words of Lilikala Kame'eleihiwa, Ph.D., Director, Center for Hawaiian Studies, University of Hawai'i at Manoa:“Mo’o were greatly feared and revered throughout Polynesia; in Hawai’i they are almost always female.”1 As with most Hawaiian akua (gods), mo’o could appear in various forms, in this case, they were usually either reptilian or human. Some sources say Mo’oinanea is the “matriarch” of mo’o gods and goddesses, including Haumea, Kihanuilulumoku, Waka and others. Others give Haumea the matriarchial credit for both mo’o and human lineage.

Kihawahine is the famous mo’o goddess of Laihaina. She was born in the sixteenth century as Princess Kihawahine Mokuhinia Kalama’ula Kala’aiheana, the daughter of the great Maui chief, Pi’ilani, and his wife, La’ieloheloheikawai. Kihawahine descended from Mo’oinanea, and had a “double mo’o” lineage through both her parents. After her death she was deified. Mary Kawena Pukui says she was “e’epa” (born with a supernatural difference, possibly having psychic powers or a disability) and was said to have died in infancy. But according to P. Christiaan Klieger, Kihawahine lived long enough to mate and have a child, Nihoa Kamalama, with Kamalama. King Kalakaua and Queen Lili’uokalani were descendents of Kihawahine through her granddaughter, Maluna.

After death, Kihawahine’s power lasted for centuries. Kamehameha I went to great lengths to associate himself with her descendents, the sacred “akua women:” Keopuolani, Keku’iapoiwa Liliha, and Kalanikauiokikilokalaniakua (Keopuolani’s aunt). Kamehameha knew that any children he would have with Keopuolani would have status above either parent as they would inherit the mana of both Hawai’i and Maui’s most prestigious genealogies.

“In obtaining these divine women, Kamehameha naturally adopted the mo’o goddess Kihawahine. She became one of his favorite deities. The conqueror had the powerful war god, Kuka’ilimoku as his “land snatcher,” but Kihawahine was one of his “land holders. She represented legitimate authority.” - P. Christiaan Klieger, Moku’ula, Mau’s Sacred Island

Kamehameha I and Keopuolani had three children who survived to adulthood, two sons: Liholiho (Kamehameha II) and Kauikeaoli (Kamehameha III), and a daughter, Nahi’ena’ena. After becoming king, Kauikeaoli ruled for many years from the little island of Moku’ula, located in a freshwater fishpond in Lahaina. This fishpond, Mokuhinia, was Kihawahine’s home. Moku’ula had been the site of Pi’ilani’s palace. Kauikeaoli was making a profound statement in ruling from Moku’ula, aligning himself (as his grandfather before him) with Kihawahine’s authority during the tumultuous, transitional period in which he lived.

A detailed description of the spiritual and political influence wielded by Kihawahine is beyond the scope of this small paper. It is best to read Klieger’s book, which gives a full account of the matter. And it is horrifying to discover that this sacred island and fishpond have been covered over to make a baseball park.

In other myths and legends, mo’o impeded Hi’iaka in her journey to bring prince Lohi’au to her sister Pele. And there are numerous stories of mo’o relationships with human beings, including the inevitable romances: “Mo’o women were dangerous to men because they had an undeniable power of seduction, and after they seduced their human lovers, they often drowned them rather than share them with another woman.”

The time dragon legend is another meaningful way to view mo’o. In Ho’opono-A Night Rainbow Book, by Pali J. Lee and John K. Willis, this legend describes the mo’o as representing a genealogy: head and eyes are future generations, the front feet are ‘opio, the children. Then the makua (parents) and kupuna (grandparents and elders). Then, ka iwi, the bones of the ancestors, followed (at the end of the tail) by ‘aumakua, the “spirit of the family, the source of all things.”

Lilikala Kame'eleihiwa also writes, “Mo’o could take the body form of a small lizard common to most Pacific islands, or in their divine form could have a lizard body thirty feet long. Since this larger lizard form had no physical or animal representation in Polynesia, the image of the Chinese dragon, or the Papua New Guinea ocean-going alligator might have inspired this image.”

But I find it difficult to believe that the significance of Kihawahine and the other mo’o stems from ancient memories of large lizards in remote lands (or, for that matter, from the tiny lizards found on the islands!). I believe that these supposed ancient memories are far too removed from the immediate concerns of Hawaiian life to account for the reverence and tremendous power associated with the mo’o. After all, ancient Hawaiians had a keen appreciation of “mana” and great care was taken to preserve and cultivate the mana of mo’o goddesses through pi’o marriages among the ali’i who were their descendents. I think the origin of the mo’o can be found closer to home.

In Hawai’i, this primordial energy represented by the mo’o was cultivated and preserved by the kapu system and through brother-sister (pi’o) marriages and other closely related alliances “in imitation of the creative passions of Papa and Wakea. ” The descendents of Pi’ilani were particularly careful to cultivate and enhance their inherited mana. But while the cultivation of mana in Hawai’i is most obviously emphasized in matters of mating and lineage, it may be that other cultural practices, such as hula and lua, also had a role in activating and cultivating mana within an individual, and that what remains of “ho’omana” traditions, which also involved the breath, are the tiniest fragments of a spiritual heritage which may once have equaled Hindu and Buddhist Tantra and Chinese Taoism in antiquity and complexity.

- I am grateful to Waihili for her brief summary of the mo'o tradition and Kihawahine.
DEAN KEKOOLANI, Feb 15, 2010


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"Kala'aiheana was the daughter of Chief Pi'ilani and a Chiefess of Maui. At her death she was deified and became Kihawahine, the reptile goddess. Kihawahine chose to become the 'aumakua of Queen Keopuolani, wife of Kamehameha I, who assumed the goddess as his own. From the time of his marriage to Keopuolani, Kamehameha I carried the image of Kihawahine with him. He credits her with his victories uniting the islands of Hawai'i and erected her image dressed in deep saffron and light yellow tapa cloth at several Maui and Hawai'i heiaus.
To this day the ocean sailing canoe Hokule'a carries her likeness. She can appear in many forms, usually as a beautiful young woman or a lizard from three inches long to thirty feet long. It was reported in October, 1965 that the pond was the scene of a display of unusual brilliance. The water was filled with flashes of light moving to and fro. Tossing a stone into the water began a brilliant display lasting for minutes.

Mrs. Halstead, who had lived in the area for eighty years, declared she had never seen anything like it. Perhaps the lights were left from the menehune when they were finished building the pond, the magic fire lingered on, brushed into the water as their torches were doused, or maybe the dancing lights were old moonbeams, trapped in the pond centuries ago when the ali'i walked along the wall...or, could it have been Kihawahine, out for a night swim in one of her favorite ponds, pulling a moonbow behind her?
Kihawahine has been seen in other ponds in Maui and other places in the world. The only great stone statue in Rapa Nui that has feet is of Kihawahine. Her home, in life, was in Moku'ula, Maui's sacred island in Lahaina. This island is in process of being restored as the walls of Ko'ie'ie Loko I'a are.
In the meantime it is possible to see Kihawahine sunning herself on the wall of Ko'ie'ie Loko I'a. Watch for her!
Ko'ie'ie Loko I'a is one of the oldest archeological sites in the United States and is listed on the National and State Register of Historic Places." 178

"The female chiefs worshipped as gods Kiha-wahine, Waka, Kalamaimu, Ahimu (or Wahimu) and Alimanoano. These deities were reptiles, or moo." 179

"Kiha-wahine, Keawe-nui-kauo-hilo, Hia, and Keolo-ewa were akua noho who talked."179

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178. ForMaui (Fishpond 'Ohana Restoration~Maui), "Koi'ie'ie Loko I'a: Historic Royal Fish Pond of South Maui (ca 150-250 AD)," http://www.formaui.org/3wave2-2.htm#, Accessed 11 Dec 2004.
179. David Malo, Hawaiian Antiquities, Honolulu: Bishop Museum Press, 1951.

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Kamehameha III (r. 1825-1854) was the last traditional king of the Hawaiian Islands. His preferred domicile ws a tiny, silty island within a large, freshwater fishpond at Lahaina, Maui. This sacred island of Moku'ula was also home to the supernatural guardian of the royal family, the fearful lizard goddess Kihawahine. Moku'ula stood witness to one of the most trying times in Hawaiian history--with the introduction of Christianity, increasing domination of the kingdom by foreign powers, monetization of the economy, and commodification of the land. The kapu refuge at Moku'ula, with the last god-king in residence, became a symbol of traditional Hawai'i and an emblem of resistance on a landscape of change.

They had the following children:

  M i Living

Living [Parents]

Living [Parents]

Other marriages:
Keakealani (Keakealanikane, Keakealani-kane), (Mo'i, King of Hawai'i)

They had the following children:

  F i Living

Kihapiilani (Kiha-a-Piilani, Kiha) (King of Maui) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15.(King married 16, 17, 18, 19 Living.

Other marriages:
Living
Living
Living

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):Kelea (w) remarried, to Kalamakua (k), chief of Halawa. Born was Laielohelohe (w), who pi'o married Piilani (k). Born was Lonoapiilani (k), killed by Kiha in battle. Born was Kihaapiilani (k). King of Maui. Born was Piikeaapiilani (w), wife of Umi, chief of Hawaii.

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):
Look at Kihaapiilani (k) who married Kumaka (w), chiefess of Hana. Born was Kamalalawalu (k); Kamalalawalu was the chief of Maui.

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):
Kihaapiilani (k) remarried, to Koleamoku (w), daughter of Hoolae (k), chief of Kauiki, and Kaululena (w), chiefess of Waiakea, Hilo, Hawaii and Kauhiokalani (k) was born.

Look at Keleanohoanaapiapi (w), the own sister of Kawao Kaohele (k), the chiefly king surrounding Maui until Piilani (k).
1. Here are the ancestors - Kawaokaohele (k), King of Maui.
2. Keleanohoanaapiapi (w), Queen of Maui.
3. Piilani (k), King of Maui.
4. Kihaapiilani (k). King of Maui.
5. Kamalalawalu (k). King of Maui.
6. Kauhiakama (k), King of Maui.
7. Kaianikaumakaowakea (k), King of Maui.
8. Lonohonuakini (k). King of Maui.
9. Kaulahea (k) II, King of Maui.
10. Kekaulikekalanikuihonoikamoku (k). King of Maui.
11. Kamehamehanui (k). King of Maui.
12. Kahekili (k), last King of Maui.

Living [Parents]

Other marriages:
Living

They had the following children:

  M i Living

Kihapiilani (Kiha-a-Piilani, Kiha) (King of Maui) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15.(King married 16 Living.

Other marriages:
Living
Living
Living

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):Kelea (w) remarried, to Kalamakua (k), chief of Halawa. Born was Laielohelohe (w), who pi'o married Piilani (k). Born was Lonoapiilani (k), killed by Kiha in battle. Born was Kihaapiilani (k). King of Maui. Born was Piikeaapiilani (w), wife of Umi, chief of Hawaii.

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):
Look at Kihaapiilani (k) who married Kumaka (w), chiefess of Hana. Born was Kamalalawalu (k); Kamalalawalu was the chief of Maui.

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):
Kihaapiilani (k) remarried, to Koleamoku (w), daughter of Hoolae (k), chief of Kauiki, and Kaululena (w), chiefess of Waiakea, Hilo, Hawaii and Kauhiokalani (k) was born.

Look at Keleanohoanaapiapi (w), the own sister of Kawao Kaohele (k), the chiefly king surrounding Maui until Piilani (k).
1. Here are the ancestors - Kawaokaohele (k), King of Maui.
2. Keleanohoanaapiapi (w), Queen of Maui.
3. Piilani (k), King of Maui.
4. Kihaapiilani (k). King of Maui.
5. Kamalalawalu (k). King of Maui.
6. Kauhiakama (k), King of Maui.
7. Kaianikaumakaowakea (k), King of Maui.
8. Lonohonuakini (k). King of Maui.
9. Kaulahea (k) II, King of Maui.
10. Kekaulikekalanikuihonoikamoku (k). King of Maui.
11. Kamehamehanui (k). King of Maui.
12. Kahekili (k), last King of Maui.

Living

They had the following children:

  F i Living

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