Kekoolani Genealogy of the Descendants of the Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii


Living

Living [Parents]

They had the following children:

  M i Living

Living [Parents]

Living

They had the following children:

  F i Living
  M ii Living
  F iii Living

Living

Living [Parents]

They had the following children:

  F i Living

Living [Parents]

Other marriages:
Living

Living [Parents]

They had the following children:

  F i Living
  M ii Living

Living [Parents]

Other marriages:
Living

Living

They had the following children:

  M i Living
  M ii Living
  M iii Living
  M iv Living
  M v Living
  M vi Living

Makaoku (Alii-o-Hilo) [Parents] 1 was born about 1604 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy. He married Hinaiakamalama.

Hinaiakamalama 1 was born about 1604 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy. She married Makaoku (Alii-o-Hilo).


Wakalana (Chief of Wailuku) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4 was born about 1252 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy (Maui). He married 5, 6 Neleike.

Other marriages:
Kauai,

Wakalana was the rival Wailuku chief to Kamaloohua, Ruling Chief (Alii Aimoku) of Maui.

Neleike 1, 2, 3 was born about 1252 in the Ulu-Hema Genealogy (Maui). She married 4, 5 Wakalana (Chief of Wailuku).

Tradition records that a vessel called " Mamala" arrived at Wailuku [Maui]. The captain's name is said to have been Kaluiki-a-Manu, and the names of the other people on board are given in the tradition as Neleike, Malaea, Haakoa, and Hika. These latter comprised both men and women, and it is said that Neleike became the wife of Wakalana and the mother of his son Alo-o-ia, and that they became the' progenitors of a light-coloured family, "poe ohana Kekea," and that they were white people, with bright, shining eyes, "Kanaka Keokeo a ua alohilohi na mka." The tradition further states that their descendants were plentiful in or about Waimalo and Honouliuli on Oahu, and that their appearance and countenances changed by intermarriage with the Hawaiian people. (FORNANDER, "An Account of the Polynesia People")

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NELEIKI MA

Here are some of the first haole to come to Hawai’i nei. They arrived during the time of Wakalana the chief of Maui and his wife Kaua’i. Some people say that it was during the time of Kaka’alaneo that these people arrived, while others say that it was Kukanaloa who arrived during the time of Kaka’alaneo. The ship came to Wailuku, Maui; it was the Mamala; the captain was Kuluikia-Manu, and on board were Masawell, Neleiki, Malaea, Ha’akoa, and Hika- some were men and some were women. It is said by some that Neleiki mated with Wakalana and that their child was Alo’oia, who became the chief after Wakalana; others say that Alo’oia was Kaua’i’s child. This was before the year AD. 900. They were perhaps the ancestors of the albino people, "kapo’e kekea". There are many of these people at Wai-mánalo in Honouliuli [Honolulu], O’ahu. Their features are different from other Hawaiians. (S.M. KAMAKAU, "Ka Moolelo o Kamehameha I")

NOTE BY DEAN KEKOOLANI:
Alo’oia, the possible child of Neleiki, is my 32nd great-grandfather. At 20 years a generation, the arrival of the foreign woman Neleike would have been in the 1400's as opposed to the date put forth by Kamakau of 900. This would make a European ship arrival in the Hawaiian Islands a possibility long before James Cook. The boat was perhaps Spanish or Dutch, having arrived in the Pacific via the European-Asian trading routes in the Indian Ocean (through Southeast Asia and up north through the South Pacific to Hawaii). The names could clearly be European: Masawell (Maxwell), Neleiki (Elizabeth, Nellie), Malaea (Maria).


Neleike is the name given by Kamakau for the mother of Alo-o-ia.


Living

Living [Parents]


Living

Living

They had the following children:

  F i Living

Keaweopala (Keawe'opala) [Parents] 1, 2, 3 died about 1752. He married 4 Living.

Other marriages:
Living
Moana (Moana-wahine, Moana-o-Kauhiahaki), (High Priestess)

Living

They had the following children:

  F i Living

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