Kekoolani Genealogy of the Descendants of the Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii

Citations


Kumuhonua (Kumuhonua-a-Palipalihia)

1Ka Nonanona (Newspaper) OCTOBER 25, 1842 Page 49 "Mookuauhau" (Reprinted in "HAWAIIAN GENEALOGIES VOLUME 1" (Edith McKinzie)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.


Haloiho

1Ka Nonanona (Newspaper) OCTOBER 25, 1842 Page 49 "Mookuauhau" (Reprinted in "HAWAIIAN GENEALOGIES VOLUME 1" (Edith McKinzie)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.


Palipalihia ("Foundational Chief")

1Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant), Chant 12.
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.
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Ahukai (Ahukai I, Ahukai-o-Kumuhonua)

1Ka Nonanona (Newspaper) OCTOBER 25, 1842 Page 49 "Mookuauhau" (Reprinted in "HAWAIIAN GENEALOGIES VOLUME 1" (Edith McKinzie)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.


Holehana

1Ka Nonanona (Newspaper) OCTOBER 25, 1842 Page 49 "Mookuauhau" (Reprinted in "HAWAIIAN GENEALOGIES VOLUME 1" (Edith McKinzie)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.


Kapili

1Ka Nonanona (Newspaper) OCTOBER 25, 1842 Page 49 "Mookuauhau" (Reprinted in "HAWAIIAN GENEALOGIES VOLUME 1" (Edith McKinzie)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.


Alonainai

1Ka Nonanona (Newspaper) OCTOBER 25, 1842 Page 49 "Mookuauhau" (Reprinted in "HAWAIIAN GENEALOGIES VOLUME 1" (Edith McKinzie)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.


Kawakupua

1Ka Nonanona (Newspaper) OCTOBER 25, 1842 Page 49 "Mookuauhau" (Reprinted in "HAWAIIAN GENEALOGIES VOLUME 1" (Edith McKinzie)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.


Heleaeiluna

1Ka Nonanona (Newspaper) OCTOBER 25, 1842 Page 49 "Mookuauhau" (Reprinted in "HAWAIIAN GENEALOGIES VOLUME 1" (Edith McKinzie)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.


Kawakahiko

1Ka Nonanona (Newspaper) OCTOBER 25, 1842 Page 49 "Mookuauhau" (Reprinted in "HAWAIIAN GENEALOGIES VOLUME 1" (Edith McKinzie)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.


Kahohaia

1Ka Nonanona (Newspaper) OCTOBER 25, 1842 Page 49 "Mookuauhau" (Reprinted in "HAWAIIAN GENEALOGIES VOLUME 1" (Edith McKinzie)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.


Kahikolupa

1Ka Nonanona (Newspaper) OCTOBER 25, 1842 Page 49 "Mookuauhau" (Reprinted in "HAWAIIAN GENEALOGIES VOLUME 1" (Edith McKinzie)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.


Lukaua

1Ka Nonanona (Newspaper) OCTOBER 25, 1842 Page 49 "Mookuauhau" (Reprinted in "HAWAIIAN GENEALOGIES VOLUME 1" (Edith McKinzie)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.


Kahikoleikau

1Ka Nonanona (Newspaper) OCTOBER 25, 1842 Page 49 "Mookuauhau" (Reprinted in "HAWAIIAN GENEALOGIES VOLUME 1" (Edith McKinzie)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.


Kupomakaikaelene

1Ka Nonanona (Newspaper) OCTOBER 25, 1842 Page 49 "Mookuauhau" (Reprinted in "HAWAIIAN GENEALOGIES VOLUME 1" (Edith McKinzie)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.


Kahikoleiulu

1Ka Nonanona (Newspaper) OCTOBER 25, 1842 Page 49 "Mookuauhau" (Reprinted in "HAWAIIAN GENEALOGIES VOLUME 1" (Edith McKinzie)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.


Kanemakaikaelene

1Ka Nonanona (Newspaper) OCTOBER 25, 1842 Page 49 "Mookuauhau" (Reprinted in "HAWAIIAN GENEALOGIES VOLUME 1" (Edith McKinzie)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.


Kahikoleihonua

1Kamakau, Samuel Manaiakalani, Ka Nupepa Kuokoa (Newspaper) FEBRUARY 29, 1868 (Reprinted in "Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii" (Appendix)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.


Haakookeau

1Ka Nonanona (Newspaper) OCTOBER 25, 1842 Page 49 "Mookuauhau" (Reprinted in "HAWAIIAN GENEALOGIES VOLUME 1" (Edith McKinzie)).

2Kalakaua, David (H.M. King Kalakaua) - Translator, The Kumulipo (A Hawaiian Geneaological and Creation Chant).
A traditional Hawaiian chant, part of the vast corpus of unwritten (oral) literature of Hawaii. The Kumulipo was last ceremonially recited as a mele inoa or "name chant" on the occasion of the birth of a high chief for the Big Island ali'i Kalaninuiiamamao (Ka'i'imamao). It is also believed that the High Chief Keeaumoku Papaiaheahe was the last who requested that the chant be recited for him in the traditional manner as he was on his deathbed.