Kekoolani Genealogy of the Descendants of the Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii


Kumuhana (Ruling Chief of O'ahu) [Parents] 1, 2.(Ruling married Keelanihonuaiakama. He had other parents.

Other marriages:
Lonokahikini,

Some genealogies say the mother of Kumuhana is Lonokahikini.

Keelanihonuaiakama [Parents] 1. married Kumuhana (Ruling Chief of O'ahu).

Daughter of Peleioholani, Ruler of O'ahu. She was murdered on the island of Molokai. Her father, Peleioholani, was a legendary warrior king, and avenged his daughter's death by ivading Molokai and visting widespread death and destruction upon it's inhabitants.

It is said that he spared that only the family of Kaiakea survived with their persons and property intact. They were saved by the fact that Kaiake was married to Kalanipoo, another daughter of Peleioholani, by his sister-wife Kukuimakalani.

Molokai was thereafter a possession a O'ahu up until the fall of Kahahana, last independent king of O'ahu (nephew of Peleioholani).

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FORNANDER:

"About the year 1764 or 1765, for some reasons not now known, the Molokai chiefs killed Keelanihonuaiakama, a daughter of Peleioholani, and on that occasion he took such a signal vengeance upon them that the island remained quiet in the possession of the Oahu sovereigns until the downfall of Kahahana. In this crusade and last military expedition of Peleioholani the revolted Molokai chiefs, mostly from the Koolau and Manae sides of the island, were either killed and burned or driven out of the island."

They had the following children:

  F i Nalanipipio (Nalanipipio II).

Kaiakea (Molokai Chief) [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born about 1757 in Honolulu, Hawaii. He married 4 Kanemahinui.

Other marriages:
Kalanipoo-a-Peleioholani,
Kalanimanuia (Kalanimanuia III),

Need Kaiake's parents. Have 1 grandfather.

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An account of the Polynesian race: its origins and migrations, and the ...
By Abraham Fornander, John F. G. Stokes


PAGE 73 (footnote)

“The high consideration in which the Kaiakea family was formerly held throughout the group may be inferred from the connections it formed by its marriages. Kuikai as stated above married a daughter of Kalanipehu; his son Kanehoalani married Kaweloaaikanaka, daughter of Kawelo-peekoa of Kauai. His grandson Kukalanihooluae married Aialei, granddaughter of Ilikileele, of the Liloa-Hakau and Keawe-a-Umi branches of the Hawaii chiefs. Kaiakea himself married Kalani-poo-a-Peleioholani, a daughter of Kukuiaimakalani, who was a daughter of Kualii and own sister to Peleioholani, who died about 8 years before the discovery of the Hawaiian group by Captain Cook. Kaiakea’s son, the grandfather of the author’s wife, was a staunch and personal friend of Kamehameha I, who, referring to the unsettled state of the group, the treachery and anarchy prevailing at the time, remarked that “Kekuelike’s house was the only place he sleep with his malo off”, that is, that he could sleep undressed without fear of violence or treachery. It was to Kekuelike’s place at Kalamaula, Molokai, that the Maui royal family, including Kalola and Keopuolani, afterwards Kamehameha’s wife, fled for refuge after the disastrous battle of Iao in Wailkuku.”

* NOTE: Fornander is a trusted source for information on the Molokai chiefs in that he was married to the great-grandaughter of Kaiakea.

Kanemahinui 1. married 2 Kaiakea (Molokai Chief).

They had the following children:

  M i Kaleikuahulu 1.
  F ii Kaakaupea (Kaakaupea II, Kapakakea, Kaakaupua) 1.

She married her half-brother Kekuelikenui.
  M iii Kuehu 1.

Kaiakea (Molokai Chief) [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born about 1757 in Honolulu, Hawaii. He married Kalanimanuia (Kalanimanuia III).

Other marriages:
Kalanipoo-a-Peleioholani,
Kanemahinui,

Need Kaiake's parents. Have 1 grandfather.

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An account of the Polynesian race: its origins and migrations, and the ...
By Abraham Fornander, John F. G. Stokes


PAGE 73 (footnote)

“The high consideration in which the Kaiakea family was formerly held throughout the group may be inferred from the connections it formed by its marriages. Kuikai as stated above married a daughter of Kalanipehu; his son Kanehoalani married Kaweloaaikanaka, daughter of Kawelo-peekoa of Kauai. His grandson Kukalanihooluae married Aialei, granddaughter of Ilikileele, of the Liloa-Hakau and Keawe-a-Umi branches of the Hawaii chiefs. Kaiakea himself married Kalani-poo-a-Peleioholani, a daughter of Kukuiaimakalani, who was a daughter of Kualii and own sister to Peleioholani, who died about 8 years before the discovery of the Hawaiian group by Captain Cook. Kaiakea’s son, the grandfather of the author’s wife, was a staunch and personal friend of Kamehameha I, who, referring to the unsettled state of the group, the treachery and anarchy prevailing at the time, remarked that “Kekuelike’s house was the only place he sleep with his malo off”, that is, that he could sleep undressed without fear of violence or treachery. It was to Kekuelike’s place at Kalamaula, Molokai, that the Maui royal family, including Kalola and Keopuolani, afterwards Kamehameha’s wife, fled for refuge after the disastrous battle of Iao in Wailkuku.”

* NOTE: Fornander is a trusted source for information on the Molokai chiefs in that he was married to the great-grandaughter of Kaiakea.

Kalanimanuia (Kalanimanuia III). married Kaiakea (Molokai Chief).

They had the following children:

  F i Kalanikiekie (Kalanikiekie-a-Kaiakea) 1.
  M ii Kanapakumaku 1.

Kukalanihooluae [Parents] 1. married 2 Aialee.

Aialee 1. married 2 Kukalanihooluae.

They had the following children:

  M i Kaiakea (Molokai Chief) was born about 1757.

Kumuhana (Ruling Chief of O'ahu) [Parents] 1, 2.(Ruling married 3 Lonokahikini. He had other parents.

Other marriages:
Keelanihonuaiakama,

Some genealogies say the mother of Kumuhana is Lonokahikini.

Lonokahikini [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. married 7 Kumuhana (Ruling Chief of O'ahu).

Other marriages:
Peleioholani (Peleioholani I), (King, Ruling Chief of O'ahu)

In the list which appears in the Robinson genealogy, S.L.K. Peleioholani seems to indicate that Lonokahikini is the full sister of Peleioholani, but this might not be the case. No other genealogies seem to explain the lineage of Lonokahikini.

SLK Pelioholani gives the children of Kualii in the following:
(1) ANCESTRY OF JOHN LIWAI: Peleioholani, Kapiohookalani, Kukuimakalani
(2) ROBINSON GENEALOGY: Lonokahikini

We haven't found any works mentioning Kaionuilanilalahai, but she is well documented as a child of Kualii in other histories.

They had the following children:

  M i Kaneoneo (Ka-neoneo, Kaneoneo-a-Peleioholani).

Kaneoneo (Ka-neoneo, Kaneoneo-a-Peleioholani) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. married 9, 10, 11 Kalanikauiokikilo (Kalani Kaumehameha, Kalaniakua, Kekumano, Kikilo, Kekilo) (Maui Chiefess, Ninaupi'o).

Other marriages:
Kamakahelei (Ka-maka-helei), (Ruling Queen of Kauai)
Kauhiaimoku-a-Kama (Kauhiaimoku-a-Kama II, Kauhiamoku),

Kanoenoe-a-Peleiohlani is a name variation sometimes seen. Chief Genealogist Solomon Peleioholani confirms that the correct name (spelling) is Kaneoneo.

There ia an alternat pedigree which has Keeaumoku IV and Kapueo-o-kalani (full brother-sister) as his parents, making him a Pio chief.

Kalanikauiokikilo (Kalani Kaumehameha, Kalaniakua, Kekumano, Kikilo, Kekilo) (Maui Chiefess, Ninaupi'o) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12.(Maui married 13, 14, 15 Kaneoneo (Ka-neoneo, Kaneoneo-a-Peleioholani).

Other marriages:
Keaweokahikona (Keawe-o-kahikona),
Kamehamehanui Ailuau, (Mo'i, Ruler of Maui)
Kalaniulumoku (Kalaniulumoku I, Kaulumoku I),
Kalahuimoku (Kalahuimoku III, Kalahumoku, Kalahumoku-a-Mopua), (Ali'i-o-Hana)

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FULL NAME: Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu

Kalanikauiokikilo is a person who, like her ancestor, Kalanikauleleaiwi (Queen of Hawa'i Island), appears at several locations as an ancestor in the Kekoolani family tree. She is a multiple ancestor. Therefore, her "mana" is believed to be very strong in the Kekoolani & Peleioholani family bloodline.

In the genealogies, these are her various names:

- Kalaniakua
- Kekumano (Fornander)
- Kekukamano
- Kalanikauiokekilo
- Kalanikikilo
- Kalanikekilo
- Kikilo
- Kekilo
- Kahakui
- Kalani Kaumehameha
- Kaumehameha
- Kamehameha-wahine
- Kalani-Kauko'oluaole

It is said that she committed suicide, rather than marry King Kamehameha the Great.

She was an extremely sacred kapu high chiefess of Maui. The "pio" daughter of Kamehamehanui (Ruler of Maui) and his royal sister Kalolo (who was also married into and became the mother of the Hawai'i Island royal family). She married her own father, producing a son (Kalaniulumoku I). She then married that son, producing three healthy son/grandsons. One of these, Kalanihelemaiiluna, was the grandfather of Pauahi (Bernice Bishop).

CHILDREN OF KEKAULIKE & KEKUAPOIWA NUI

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):

"Keiki 1 - Kamehamehanui (k), King of Maui
Keiki 2 - Kalola (w)
Keiki 3 - Kuhooheiheipahu (w)
Keiki 4 - Kahekili (k), King of Maui

Look at Kamehameha nui (k) and Kalola (w); they are the own parents of Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu (w), the chiefess of Maui whose head is held high in the daytime."

[She was ninaupi'o chiefess, the hjighest possible rank of chief, because her parents were full blooded brother and sisters, the father being a ruling chief and himself a niau pi'o son. There was a famous taboo, named after this chiefess (see #6 below).]

"That is for us to stand in the midday sun when you can speak with a sharp tongue about the descendants of Kaikilanialiiwahineopuna and Kaukalihoano the third standard bearer of Kahoalii, and therefore, we have taken up our banner and kapu stick [insignia]. The islands have been won by us-Hawaii, Maui, Molokai, Oahu, Kauai, and the islands have been united for us; no island remains, not even the kapus. Here are the kapus:
1. He-iki-holu no Pakaalana
2. He-iki-alealea no Haleakeawe
3. He-iki-pua aholehole no Hikiau
4. He-opeope kau i kahi e
5. He kukuia i ke awakea
6. He poohoolewaikala oia o Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu (w)
7. He-ahi-ka mea e manalo ai. "

- Dean P. Kekoolani (January 24, 2010)
Kapolei, Oahu, Hawaii

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Ka Makaainana (newspaper) JULY 27, 1896 "Mookuauhau Ali'i: Na Iwikuamoo o Hawaii Nei Mai Kahiki Mai":
In this newspaper article we see the difficult to understand alternate name of "Kahakui".
Also, her son Kalaniulumoku iI s called simply "Kalani".
Her son Kalaniulumoku II is also known as the High Chief "Namaile" or "Kamaile".

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SHE IS HIGH CHIEFESS "KALANI KAUMEHAMEHA"

In the following genealogy of Kahikikala, she is called "Kalani Kaumehameha".

Mother: Kalani Kaumehameha
Father: Kalahumoku (Kalahumoku II, Kalahuimoku I)
Child: Kahikikala (Ruling Chiefess of Hana, Kipahulu and Kaupo)

High Chief Keoua Kalanikupuapa-i-nui sought this chiefess Kahikikila (daughter of Kaumehameha or Kalanikauiokikilo) for a wife because of her high rank and sacred kapus, which he hoped to acquire for his own offspring.

FROM History of Keoua Kalanikupuapa-i-nui (By Elizabeth Kekaaniauokalani Kalaninuiohilaukapu Pratt):

"Comely of person and gracious to all he met, Keoua as he verged toward manhood became an attractive personage. While yet awaiting the fulfilment of the plighted troth of his childhood, rumors of events in Maui royal circles were wafted across the waters of Alenuihaha channel which stirred his ambition. They were of the two beautiful daughters of Kalahumoku and his wife Kalani Kaumehameha. Kalahumoku was the reigning high chief of all Hana including also the districts of Kipahulu and Kaupo, whose decease had just taken place, his eldest daughter Kahikikala assuming the right of successorship in governing his people. Kalahumoku was a lineal descendant of Loe, the great progenitor of Maui's chiefdom, the Piilanis, Kamalalawalu and others, and of the Hana aliis as well.

This family possessed a wonderful tabu entirely different from, and never known to exist among, any of the other chief families of the Hawaiian group. It was styled "Ka Poo hoolewa i ka La," and inherited from Kaakaualaninui, the grandmother of Kalahumoku. It signified the laying of the head toward the sun's position in the heavens from its rising unto its setting. Days for the observance of this tabu were strictly kept. The only time for recreation during the tabu must be taken from between the setting of the luminary and the dawn of a new day."

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About the kapu which is properly titled "He poohoolewaikala oia o Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu"
(An explaination by Dean Kekoolani)

The kapu "Ka Poo hoolewa i ka La" mentioned in the above story which is said to have belonged to the chiefess Kahikikala was inherited from the mother's side, the side of chiefess Kalani Kaumehameha, who was also known as Kalanikuaiokikilo. It was not inherited from the father's side, the father's grandmother Kaakaualaninui, as was taught by the knowledgeable chiefess Elizabeth Kekaaniauokalani Kalaninuiohilaukapu Pratt. She is rarely wrong, but in this case we must differ with her. Her book on her chiefly and famous ancestor Keoua Kalanikupuapa-i-nui is quite excellent. She was also a very good friend and relative of this genealogist's great-grandfather Solomon Peleioholani. But the Chiefess Kekaaniauokalani's teaching on this matter is not correct.

Although the woman Kaakaualaninui was a highly tabued and sacred chiefess of Koolau, O'ahu being a Kumuhonua chiefess of impeccable pedogree, with exceptionally high rank by any island's standards, the kapu "Ka Poo hoolewa i ka La" was not hers. that kapu comes from only one possible place. It came directly from the the Kahihikala's mother Kalani Kaumehameha, who we understand to be the chiefess also named Kalanikauiokikilo . That very special tabu is associated specifically with her, it requires that the sun must always be kept at a certain angle to her head.

Kalanikauiokikilo was reknown for this very unique kapu. We are taught by the High Chief and genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheuila Peleioholani that the proper title for this exceptionally rare and formidable kapu belonging only to the Kalaniakua Kalanikauioiokiilo is "He poohoolewaikala oia o Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu". This kapu was a one of the coveted kapus of the kingdom of the islands, won by conquest and also legally inherited by bloodright, obtained by the Kamehamehas and their chiefs. Here are the other kapus of the Hawaiian Kingdom:

* "He-iki-holu Paakalana"
* "He-iki-alealea no Haleakeawe"
* "He-iki-pua aholehole no Hikiau"
* "He-opeope kau i kahi e"
* "He kukuia i ke awakea"
* "He-ahi-ka mea e manalo ai"

The fact that Kalani Kaumehameha was another name for Kalnikuiokikilo is further verified by the genealogy of the Kuikahi Family of Waipio Valley, Ka'u and Kohala. The Kuikahi family genealogy seerts firmly that Kalani Kaumenameha was the pi'o daughter of Kamenamenanui and his sister Kalola. There was only one such daughter ever from that sacred chiefly union, which was the exalted ninaupio chiefess Kalanikauiokikilo, who because of her exceedingly high rank and status (she was kalani-akua, a"living god", in flesh among humans) she had many many names and was known by many names all over the islands: on Maui, O'ahu, Hawaii, Moloka'i, Lanai and Kauai. .We now know understand that Kalanikauiokikilo also known as Kalani Kaumehameha, being she she was the daughter of King Kamehmehanui Ailua of Maui.

Finally, please not that there are no contradictory genealogies to this story of Kalani Kaumehameha. So it is should be resolved and accepted by all who understand.

- Dean Kekoolani
February 2, 2010
Ewa-a-Laakona, O'ahu, Hawaii

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Haleki'i and Pihana Heiau
By Lyons Kapi'ioho Naone III
(EXCERPT)

It is believed that in 1790 Kamehameha I invoked his war god at Pihana after his defeat of Kalanikupuli's forces in Iao Valley(serum 1909:46). After this battle, Kamehameha sent for the Maui chiefess Kalani-Kauko'oluaole, a daughter of Kamehameha Nui, whom he believed had insulted him at Kaupo. Poloahilani, foster-sister of Kalani-Kauko'oluaole, was sent instead and sacrificed by Karnehameha at Pihana. She was the last sacrifice at Pihana.

Born at Pihana was Keopuolani, a chiefess of divine rank and descendant of the ruling chiefs of Maui and Hawaii. She became the wife of Kamehameha I and mother of Liholiho (Kamehameha II) and Kauikeaouli (Kamehameha III).

Pihana was demolished by Kalanimakamauali'i and Kauanaulu during Ka'ahumanu's proclamation in 1819 (Stokes, 1916)

The Wailuku area was a major gathering place and residential site of the Maui high chiefs and those of rank. The area from Waihe'e to Wailuku was the largest continuous area of wet taro cultivation in the Hawaiian Islands (Handy and Handy, 1972:496). To the southeast of Iao Stream, below Pihana Heiau, was Kauahea where warriors dwelt and were trained in war skills. This was a boxing site in the time of Kahekili.

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FORANDER "AN ACCOUNT..." p338

We learn from Vancouver that at this time Kaheiheimalie, afterwards known as Hoapiliwahine, a younger sister of Kaahumanu, was still the wife of Kamehameha's brother, Kalaimamahu. Vancouver also mentions "a captive daughter of Kahekili," who was then residing at Kamehameha's court. The person referred to was either one of Kahekili's nieces and his sister Kalola's daughters, Kalaniakua or Liliha Kekuiapoiwa, or else Kalola's granddaughter, Keopuolani, which three ladies were brought from Molokai to Hawaii by Kamehameha after the death of Kalola, as related on page 238.

(NOTE: The captive chiefess is Kalanikauiokikilo, who refused to marry Kamehameha, escaped a death sentence, but remained trapped at his court as a VIP captive. She escaped by committing suicide. - DEAN KEKOOLANI)

They had the following children:

  M i Kalaninoanoa (Kalanionaona, Kauanoanoa, Kaleinoanoa) ("Heavenly Chief" of Kauai).
  U ii Kalaniomaiheuila (Kalaniomaiheuila II) ("Heavenly Chief" of Kauai) 1, 2, 3, 4.

Kaneoneo (Ka-neoneo, Kaneoneo-a-Peleioholani) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. married 9 Kamakahelei (Ka-maka-helei) (Ruling Queen of Kauai).

Other marriages:
Kalanikauiokikilo (Kalani Kaumehameha, Kalaniakua, Kekumano, Kikilo, Kekilo), (Maui C NO
Kauhiaimoku-a-Kama (Kauhiaimoku-a-Kama II, Kauhiamoku),

Kanoenoe-a-Peleiohlani is a name variation sometimes seen. Chief Genealogist Solomon Peleioholani confirms that the correct name (spelling) is Kaneoneo.

There ia an alternat pedigree which has Keeaumoku IV and Kapueo-o-kalani (full brother-sister) as his parents, making him a Pio chief.

Kamakahelei (Ka-maka-helei) (Ruling Queen of Kauai) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.(Ruling married 8 Kaneoneo (Ka-neoneo, Kaneoneo-a-Peleioholani).

Other marriages:
Ka'eo-kulani (Ka'eo-ku-lani), (King of Maui)
Kini,

They had the following children:

  F i Kapuaamohu (Kawalu Kapuaamohu) died on 5 Jun 1832.
  F ii Lelemahoalani (Lele-mahoalani) 1, 2.

Kaneoneo (Ka-neoneo, Kaneoneo-a-Peleioholani) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. married Kauhiaimoku-a-Kama (Kauhiaimoku-a-Kama II, Kauhiamoku).

Other marriages:
Kalanikauiokikilo (Kalani Kaumehameha, Kalaniakua, Kekumano, Kikilo, Kekilo), (Maui C NO
Kamakahelei (Ka-maka-helei), (Ruling Queen of Kauai)

Kanoenoe-a-Peleiohlani is a name variation sometimes seen. Chief Genealogist Solomon Peleioholani confirms that the correct name (spelling) is Kaneoneo.

There ia an alternat pedigree which has Keeaumoku IV and Kapueo-o-kalani (full brother-sister) as his parents, making him a Pio chief.

Kauhiaimoku-a-Kama (Kauhiaimoku-a-Kama II, Kauhiamoku) [Parents] 1, 2. married Kaneoneo (Ka-neoneo, Kaneoneo-a-Peleioholani).

Other marriages:
Kauakahiakua (Kauakahiakua III),

They had the following children:

  F i Kaomealani (Kaomealani II) 1.

Keaweokahikona (Keawe-o-kahikona) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. married 7, 8, 9 Kalanikauiokikilo (Kalani Kaumehameha, Kalaniakua, Kekumano, Kikilo, Kekilo) (Maui Chiefess, Ninaupi'o).

War Leader of Kalaniopu'u. Keaweokahikona (Keawe-o-kahikona) is the 2nd great grandfather of Solomon L K Peleioholani (Peleioholani IV).

From Solomon L.K. Peleioholani:

Kalanikumaikiekie (w) niaupio married her brother Keaweikekahimakaoi; born was Mokulanl (k), high chief governing Hilo; Mokulani married Papaikaniaunui (w), wife of Kaulahea. King of Maui; born was Ululaninui (w), who married Keawemauhili (k); born was Keaweokahikona (k), grandfather of S. L. K. Peleioholani, first son.

Keawemauhili was reknown because he possessed many intertwined kapus. His name means "intertwined or knotted". His wife's father Mokulani was a ninau-pio chief (the highest god-like rank for a sacred chief because his mother and father were full-blooded brother and sister). This is why the son Keaweokahikona was of judged to be of sufficiently high rank to marry and sire children with the great Kalanikauiokikilo, the highest ranking sacred ninau-pio chief alive, and the last ever of that rank to live. The next closest ranking chief was her niece Keopulani, wife of Kamehameha the Conqueror and mother of Kamehameha II and Kamehameha III.

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FORNANDER:
"Certain it is that during the summer of this year (1790), Kamehameha, assuming the style of " Moi" of Hawaii, sent to Keawemauhili of Hilo and Keoua-Kuahuula of Kau to furnish him with canoes and troops for a contemplated invasion of Maui. Keawemauhili complied with the summons of Karnehameha, and sent a large force of men and canoes under command of his own sons Keaweokahikwna, Eleele or Elelule, Koakanu, and his nephew Kalaipaihala."

Kalanikauiokikilo (Kalani Kaumehameha, Kalaniakua, Kekumano, Kikilo, Kekilo) (Maui Chiefess, Ninaupi'o) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12.(Maui married 13, 14, 15 Keaweokahikona (Keawe-o-kahikona).

Other marriages:
Kaneoneo (Ka-neoneo, Kaneoneo-a-Peleioholani),
Kamehamehanui Ailuau, (Mo'i, Ruler of Maui)
Kalaniulumoku (Kalaniulumoku I, Kaulumoku I),
Kalahuimoku (Kalahuimoku III, Kalahumoku, Kalahumoku-a-Mopua), (Ali'i-o-Hana)

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FULL NAME: Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu

Kalanikauiokikilo is a person who, like her ancestor, Kalanikauleleaiwi (Queen of Hawa'i Island), appears at several locations as an ancestor in the Kekoolani family tree. She is a multiple ancestor. Therefore, her "mana" is believed to be very strong in the Kekoolani & Peleioholani family bloodline.

In the genealogies, these are her various names:

- Kalaniakua
- Kekumano (Fornander)
- Kekukamano
- Kalanikauiokekilo
- Kalanikikilo
- Kalanikekilo
- Kikilo
- Kekilo
- Kahakui
- Kalani Kaumehameha
- Kaumehameha
- Kamehameha-wahine
- Kalani-Kauko'oluaole

It is said that she committed suicide, rather than marry King Kamehameha the Great.

She was an extremely sacred kapu high chiefess of Maui. The "pio" daughter of Kamehamehanui (Ruler of Maui) and his royal sister Kalolo (who was also married into and became the mother of the Hawai'i Island royal family). She married her own father, producing a son (Kalaniulumoku I). She then married that son, producing three healthy son/grandsons. One of these, Kalanihelemaiiluna, was the grandfather of Pauahi (Bernice Bishop).

CHILDREN OF KEKAULIKE & KEKUAPOIWA NUI

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):

"Keiki 1 - Kamehamehanui (k), King of Maui
Keiki 2 - Kalola (w)
Keiki 3 - Kuhooheiheipahu (w)
Keiki 4 - Kahekili (k), King of Maui

Look at Kamehameha nui (k) and Kalola (w); they are the own parents of Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu (w), the chiefess of Maui whose head is held high in the daytime."

[She was ninaupi'o chiefess, the hjighest possible rank of chief, because her parents were full blooded brother and sisters, the father being a ruling chief and himself a niau pi'o son. There was a famous taboo, named after this chiefess (see #6 below).]

"That is for us to stand in the midday sun when you can speak with a sharp tongue about the descendants of Kaikilanialiiwahineopuna and Kaukalihoano the third standard bearer of Kahoalii, and therefore, we have taken up our banner and kapu stick [insignia]. The islands have been won by us-Hawaii, Maui, Molokai, Oahu, Kauai, and the islands have been united for us; no island remains, not even the kapus. Here are the kapus:
1. He-iki-holu no Pakaalana
2. He-iki-alealea no Haleakeawe
3. He-iki-pua aholehole no Hikiau
4. He-opeope kau i kahi e
5. He kukuia i ke awakea
6. He poohoolewaikala oia o Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu (w)
7. He-ahi-ka mea e manalo ai. "

- Dean P. Kekoolani (January 24, 2010)
Kapolei, Oahu, Hawaii

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Ka Makaainana (newspaper) JULY 27, 1896 "Mookuauhau Ali'i: Na Iwikuamoo o Hawaii Nei Mai Kahiki Mai":
In this newspaper article we see the difficult to understand alternate name of "Kahakui".
Also, her son Kalaniulumoku iI s called simply "Kalani".
Her son Kalaniulumoku II is also known as the High Chief "Namaile" or "Kamaile".

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SHE IS HIGH CHIEFESS "KALANI KAUMEHAMEHA"

In the following genealogy of Kahikikala, she is called "Kalani Kaumehameha".

Mother: Kalani Kaumehameha
Father: Kalahumoku (Kalahumoku II, Kalahuimoku I)
Child: Kahikikala (Ruling Chiefess of Hana, Kipahulu and Kaupo)

High Chief Keoua Kalanikupuapa-i-nui sought this chiefess Kahikikila (daughter of Kaumehameha or Kalanikauiokikilo) for a wife because of her high rank and sacred kapus, which he hoped to acquire for his own offspring.

FROM History of Keoua Kalanikupuapa-i-nui (By Elizabeth Kekaaniauokalani Kalaninuiohilaukapu Pratt):

"Comely of person and gracious to all he met, Keoua as he verged toward manhood became an attractive personage. While yet awaiting the fulfilment of the plighted troth of his childhood, rumors of events in Maui royal circles were wafted across the waters of Alenuihaha channel which stirred his ambition. They were of the two beautiful daughters of Kalahumoku and his wife Kalani Kaumehameha. Kalahumoku was the reigning high chief of all Hana including also the districts of Kipahulu and Kaupo, whose decease had just taken place, his eldest daughter Kahikikala assuming the right of successorship in governing his people. Kalahumoku was a lineal descendant of Loe, the great progenitor of Maui's chiefdom, the Piilanis, Kamalalawalu and others, and of the Hana aliis as well.

This family possessed a wonderful tabu entirely different from, and never known to exist among, any of the other chief families of the Hawaiian group. It was styled "Ka Poo hoolewa i ka La," and inherited from Kaakaualaninui, the grandmother of Kalahumoku. It signified the laying of the head toward the sun's position in the heavens from its rising unto its setting. Days for the observance of this tabu were strictly kept. The only time for recreation during the tabu must be taken from between the setting of the luminary and the dawn of a new day."

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
About the kapu which is properly titled "He poohoolewaikala oia o Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu"
(An explaination by Dean Kekoolani)

The kapu "Ka Poo hoolewa i ka La" mentioned in the above story which is said to have belonged to the chiefess Kahikikala was inherited from the mother's side, the side of chiefess Kalani Kaumehameha, who was also known as Kalanikuaiokikilo. It was not inherited from the father's side, the father's grandmother Kaakaualaninui, as was taught by the knowledgeable chiefess Elizabeth Kekaaniauokalani Kalaninuiohilaukapu Pratt. She is rarely wrong, but in this case we must differ with her. Her book on her chiefly and famous ancestor Keoua Kalanikupuapa-i-nui is quite excellent. She was also a very good friend and relative of this genealogist's great-grandfather Solomon Peleioholani. But the Chiefess Kekaaniauokalani's teaching on this matter is not correct.

Although the woman Kaakaualaninui was a highly tabued and sacred chiefess of Koolau, O'ahu being a Kumuhonua chiefess of impeccable pedogree, with exceptionally high rank by any island's standards, the kapu "Ka Poo hoolewa i ka La" was not hers. that kapu comes from only one possible place. It came directly from the the Kahihikala's mother Kalani Kaumehameha, who we understand to be the chiefess also named Kalanikauiokikilo . That very special tabu is associated specifically with her, it requires that the sun must always be kept at a certain angle to her head.

Kalanikauiokikilo was reknown for this very unique kapu. We are taught by the High Chief and genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheuila Peleioholani that the proper title for this exceptionally rare and formidable kapu belonging only to the Kalaniakua Kalanikauioiokiilo is "He poohoolewaikala oia o Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu". This kapu was a one of the coveted kapus of the kingdom of the islands, won by conquest and also legally inherited by bloodright, obtained by the Kamehamehas and their chiefs. Here are the other kapus of the Hawaiian Kingdom:

* "He-iki-holu Paakalana"
* "He-iki-alealea no Haleakeawe"
* "He-iki-pua aholehole no Hikiau"
* "He-opeope kau i kahi e"
* "He kukuia i ke awakea"
* "He-ahi-ka mea e manalo ai"

The fact that Kalani Kaumehameha was another name for Kalnikuiokikilo is further verified by the genealogy of the Kuikahi Family of Waipio Valley, Ka'u and Kohala. The Kuikahi family genealogy seerts firmly that Kalani Kaumenameha was the pi'o daughter of Kamenamenanui and his sister Kalola. There was only one such daughter ever from that sacred chiefly union, which was the exalted ninaupio chiefess Kalanikauiokikilo, who because of her exceedingly high rank and status (she was kalani-akua, a"living god", in flesh among humans) she had many many names and was known by many names all over the islands: on Maui, O'ahu, Hawaii, Moloka'i, Lanai and Kauai. .We now know understand that Kalanikauiokikilo also known as Kalani Kaumehameha, being she she was the daughter of King Kamehmehanui Ailua of Maui.

Finally, please not that there are no contradictory genealogies to this story of Kalani Kaumehameha. So it is should be resolved and accepted by all who understand.

- Dean Kekoolani
February 2, 2010
Ewa-a-Laakona, O'ahu, Hawaii

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Haleki'i and Pihana Heiau
By Lyons Kapi'ioho Naone III
(EXCERPT)

It is believed that in 1790 Kamehameha I invoked his war god at Pihana after his defeat of Kalanikupuli's forces in Iao Valley(serum 1909:46). After this battle, Kamehameha sent for the Maui chiefess Kalani-Kauko'oluaole, a daughter of Kamehameha Nui, whom he believed had insulted him at Kaupo. Poloahilani, foster-sister of Kalani-Kauko'oluaole, was sent instead and sacrificed by Karnehameha at Pihana. She was the last sacrifice at Pihana.

Born at Pihana was Keopuolani, a chiefess of divine rank and descendant of the ruling chiefs of Maui and Hawaii. She became the wife of Kamehameha I and mother of Liholiho (Kamehameha II) and Kauikeaouli (Kamehameha III).

Pihana was demolished by Kalanimakamauali'i and Kauanaulu during Ka'ahumanu's proclamation in 1819 (Stokes, 1916)

The Wailuku area was a major gathering place and residential site of the Maui high chiefs and those of rank. The area from Waihe'e to Wailuku was the largest continuous area of wet taro cultivation in the Hawaiian Islands (Handy and Handy, 1972:496). To the southeast of Iao Stream, below Pihana Heiau, was Kauahea where warriors dwelt and were trained in war skills. This was a boxing site in the time of Kahekili.

------------------------------------------

FORANDER "AN ACCOUNT..." p338

We learn from Vancouver that at this time Kaheiheimalie, afterwards known as Hoapiliwahine, a younger sister of Kaahumanu, was still the wife of Kamehameha's brother, Kalaimamahu. Vancouver also mentions "a captive daughter of Kahekili," who was then residing at Kamehameha's court. The person referred to was either one of Kahekili's nieces and his sister Kalola's daughters, Kalaniakua or Liliha Kekuiapoiwa, or else Kalola's granddaughter, Keopuolani, which three ladies were brought from Molokai to Hawaii by Kamehameha after the death of Kalola, as related on page 238.

(NOTE: The captive chiefess is Kalanikauiokikilo, who refused to marry Kamehameha, escaped a death sentence, but remained trapped at his court as a VIP captive. She escaped by committing suicide. - DEAN KEKOOLANI)

They had the following children:

  F i 'I-kanaka (Ikanaka III, Ikanaka-o-Kikilo) ('I Chiefess, Ali'i-o-Hilo).

Kamehamehanui Ailuau (Mo'i, Ruler of Maui) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11.(Mo'i, married 12, 13, 14 Kalanikauiokikilo (Kalani Kaumehameha, Kalaniakua, Kekumano, Kikilo, Kekilo) (Maui Chiefess, Ninaupi'o).

Other marriages:
Kalola Pupuka-o-Honokawailani, (Kalola Nui) (Kalola Kekuipoiwa)
Namahana (Namahana-i-Kaleleokalani, Namahana-a-Kekaulike, Namahana Nui),
Kahakui,

Kamehamehanui married his own sister Kalola in the "Niau Pio" custom of Hawaiian royalty.

The marriage to this own daughter from that marriage was "Naha Pio", according to S.L.K. Pelioholani

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):
Look at Keleanohoanaapiapi (w), the own sister of Kawao Kaohele (k), the chiefly king surrounding Maui until Piilani (k).
1. Here are the ancestors - Kawaokaohele (k), King of Maui.
2. Keleanohoanaapiapi (w), Queen of Maui.
3. Piilani (k), King of Maui.
4. Kihaapiilani (k). King of Maui.
5. Kamalalawalu (k). King of Maui.
6. Kauhiakama (k), King of Maui.
7. Kaianikaumakaowakea (k), King of Maui.
8. Lonohonuakini (k). King of Maui.
9. Kaulahea (k) II, King of Maui.
10. Kekaulikekalanikuihonoikamoku (k). King of Maui.
11. Kamehamehanui (k). King of Maui.

Look at Kekaulike (k), Kekaulikeokalanikuihonoikamoku (k), King of Maui.
Here are the children:
1. Kauhiaimokuakama (k)
2. Kamehamehanui (k)
3. Ka(ola (w), mother of Kiwalao and Liliha
4. Kuhoohiehie (w) (also spelled Kuhooheihei).
5. Kahekili (k)
6. Namahanaikaleleonalani (w)
7. Kekuamanoha (k)
8. Kekuapoiula (w)/ wife of King Kahahana
9. Kaeokulani (k), Kingof Kauai
10. Manuhaaipo (w), Queen of lao
11. Ahia
12. Nahulanui [*]

Look at No. 2 and no. 3, the ancestor of Kaikioewa Palekaluhi, S. L. Kalaniomaiheuila (k), M. Kahai, and many others. This is the first generation after Kalola (w) and Kamehameha [Nui]; Liholiho Kamehameha II, this is the second generation of Kalola (w).
(V). Naahienaena I.* [* She is more commonly known as Nahienaena, the sister of Kamehameha III, Kalanikauikeaouli. This spelling is more grammatically correct, as the name means "The Raging Fires."]

Look at Constitutional King, Kauikeaouli (k), Kamehameha III. There are a large number of descendants of Kalola (w) and Kamehameha Nui.

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):
Children of Kekaulike and his half-sister and pi'o wife Kekuipoiwanui:
Keiki 1 - Kamehamehanui (k), King of Maui
Keiki 2 - Kalola (w)
Keiki 3 - Kuhooheiheipahu (w)
Keiki 4 - Kahekili (k), King of Maui

Look at Kamehameha nui (k) and Kalola (w); they are the own parents of Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu (w), the chiefess of Maui whose head is held high in the daytime.

Kalanikauiokikilo (Kalani Kaumehameha, Kalaniakua, Kekumano, Kikilo, Kekilo) (Maui Chiefess, Ninaupi'o) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12.(Maui married 13, 14, 15 Kamehamehanui Ailuau (Mo'i, Ruler of Maui).

Other marriages:
Kaneoneo (Ka-neoneo, Kaneoneo-a-Peleioholani),
Keaweokahikona (Keawe-o-kahikona),
Kalaniulumoku (Kalaniulumoku I, Kaulumoku I),
Kalahuimoku (Kalahuimoku III, Kalahumoku, Kalahumoku-a-Mopua), (Ali'i-o-Hana)

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FULL NAME: Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu

Kalanikauiokikilo is a person who, like her ancestor, Kalanikauleleaiwi (Queen of Hawa'i Island), appears at several locations as an ancestor in the Kekoolani family tree. She is a multiple ancestor. Therefore, her "mana" is believed to be very strong in the Kekoolani & Peleioholani family bloodline.

In the genealogies, these are her various names:

- Kalaniakua
- Kekumano (Fornander)
- Kekukamano
- Kalanikauiokekilo
- Kalanikikilo
- Kalanikekilo
- Kikilo
- Kekilo
- Kahakui
- Kalani Kaumehameha
- Kaumehameha
- Kamehameha-wahine
- Kalani-Kauko'oluaole

It is said that she committed suicide, rather than marry King Kamehameha the Great.

She was an extremely sacred kapu high chiefess of Maui. The "pio" daughter of Kamehamehanui (Ruler of Maui) and his royal sister Kalolo (who was also married into and became the mother of the Hawai'i Island royal family). She married her own father, producing a son (Kalaniulumoku I). She then married that son, producing three healthy son/grandsons. One of these, Kalanihelemaiiluna, was the grandfather of Pauahi (Bernice Bishop).

CHILDREN OF KEKAULIKE & KEKUAPOIWA NUI

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):

"Keiki 1 - Kamehamehanui (k), King of Maui
Keiki 2 - Kalola (w)
Keiki 3 - Kuhooheiheipahu (w)
Keiki 4 - Kahekili (k), King of Maui

Look at Kamehameha nui (k) and Kalola (w); they are the own parents of Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu (w), the chiefess of Maui whose head is held high in the daytime."

[She was ninaupi'o chiefess, the hjighest possible rank of chief, because her parents were full blooded brother and sisters, the father being a ruling chief and himself a niau pi'o son. There was a famous taboo, named after this chiefess (see #6 below).]

"That is for us to stand in the midday sun when you can speak with a sharp tongue about the descendants of Kaikilanialiiwahineopuna and Kaukalihoano the third standard bearer of Kahoalii, and therefore, we have taken up our banner and kapu stick [insignia]. The islands have been won by us-Hawaii, Maui, Molokai, Oahu, Kauai, and the islands have been united for us; no island remains, not even the kapus. Here are the kapus:
1. He-iki-holu no Pakaalana
2. He-iki-alealea no Haleakeawe
3. He-iki-pua aholehole no Hikiau
4. He-opeope kau i kahi e
5. He kukuia i ke awakea
6. He poohoolewaikala oia o Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu (w)
7. He-ahi-ka mea e manalo ai. "

- Dean P. Kekoolani (January 24, 2010)
Kapolei, Oahu, Hawaii

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ka Makaainana (newspaper) JULY 27, 1896 "Mookuauhau Ali'i: Na Iwikuamoo o Hawaii Nei Mai Kahiki Mai":
In this newspaper article we see the difficult to understand alternate name of "Kahakui".
Also, her son Kalaniulumoku iI s called simply "Kalani".
Her son Kalaniulumoku II is also known as the High Chief "Namaile" or "Kamaile".

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SHE IS HIGH CHIEFESS "KALANI KAUMEHAMEHA"

In the following genealogy of Kahikikala, she is called "Kalani Kaumehameha".

Mother: Kalani Kaumehameha
Father: Kalahumoku (Kalahumoku II, Kalahuimoku I)
Child: Kahikikala (Ruling Chiefess of Hana, Kipahulu and Kaupo)

High Chief Keoua Kalanikupuapa-i-nui sought this chiefess Kahikikila (daughter of Kaumehameha or Kalanikauiokikilo) for a wife because of her high rank and sacred kapus, which he hoped to acquire for his own offspring.

FROM History of Keoua Kalanikupuapa-i-nui (By Elizabeth Kekaaniauokalani Kalaninuiohilaukapu Pratt):

"Comely of person and gracious to all he met, Keoua as he verged toward manhood became an attractive personage. While yet awaiting the fulfilment of the plighted troth of his childhood, rumors of events in Maui royal circles were wafted across the waters of Alenuihaha channel which stirred his ambition. They were of the two beautiful daughters of Kalahumoku and his wife Kalani Kaumehameha. Kalahumoku was the reigning high chief of all Hana including also the districts of Kipahulu and Kaupo, whose decease had just taken place, his eldest daughter Kahikikala assuming the right of successorship in governing his people. Kalahumoku was a lineal descendant of Loe, the great progenitor of Maui's chiefdom, the Piilanis, Kamalalawalu and others, and of the Hana aliis as well.

This family possessed a wonderful tabu entirely different from, and never known to exist among, any of the other chief families of the Hawaiian group. It was styled "Ka Poo hoolewa i ka La," and inherited from Kaakaualaninui, the grandmother of Kalahumoku. It signified the laying of the head toward the sun's position in the heavens from its rising unto its setting. Days for the observance of this tabu were strictly kept. The only time for recreation during the tabu must be taken from between the setting of the luminary and the dawn of a new day."

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
About the kapu which is properly titled "He poohoolewaikala oia o Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu"
(An explaination by Dean Kekoolani)

The kapu "Ka Poo hoolewa i ka La" mentioned in the above story which is said to have belonged to the chiefess Kahikikala was inherited from the mother's side, the side of chiefess Kalani Kaumehameha, who was also known as Kalanikuaiokikilo. It was not inherited from the father's side, the father's grandmother Kaakaualaninui, as was taught by the knowledgeable chiefess Elizabeth Kekaaniauokalani Kalaninuiohilaukapu Pratt. She is rarely wrong, but in this case we must differ with her. Her book on her chiefly and famous ancestor Keoua Kalanikupuapa-i-nui is quite excellent. She was also a very good friend and relative of this genealogist's great-grandfather Solomon Peleioholani. But the Chiefess Kekaaniauokalani's teaching on this matter is not correct.

Although the woman Kaakaualaninui was a highly tabued and sacred chiefess of Koolau, O'ahu being a Kumuhonua chiefess of impeccable pedogree, with exceptionally high rank by any island's standards, the kapu "Ka Poo hoolewa i ka La" was not hers. that kapu comes from only one possible place. It came directly from the the Kahihikala's mother Kalani Kaumehameha, who we understand to be the chiefess also named Kalanikauiokikilo . That very special tabu is associated specifically with her, it requires that the sun must always be kept at a certain angle to her head.

Kalanikauiokikilo was reknown for this very unique kapu. We are taught by the High Chief and genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheuila Peleioholani that the proper title for this exceptionally rare and formidable kapu belonging only to the Kalaniakua Kalanikauioiokiilo is "He poohoolewaikala oia o Kalanikauiokikilo Kalaniwaiakua Kekumanomanookekapu". This kapu was a one of the coveted kapus of the kingdom of the islands, won by conquest and also legally inherited by bloodright, obtained by the Kamehamehas and their chiefs. Here are the other kapus of the Hawaiian Kingdom:

* "He-iki-holu Paakalana"
* "He-iki-alealea no Haleakeawe"
* "He-iki-pua aholehole no Hikiau"
* "He-opeope kau i kahi e"
* "He kukuia i ke awakea"
* "He-ahi-ka mea e manalo ai"

The fact that Kalani Kaumehameha was another name for Kalnikuiokikilo is further verified by the genealogy of the Kuikahi Family of Waipio Valley, Ka'u and Kohala. The Kuikahi family genealogy seerts firmly that Kalani Kaumenameha was the pi'o daughter of Kamenamenanui and his sister Kalola. There was only one such daughter ever from that sacred chiefly union, which was the exalted ninaupio chiefess Kalanikauiokikilo, who because of her exceedingly high rank and status (she was kalani-akua, a"living god", in flesh among humans) she had many many names and was known by many names all over the islands: on Maui, O'ahu, Hawaii, Moloka'i, Lanai and Kauai. .We now know understand that Kalanikauiokikilo also known as Kalani Kaumehameha, being she she was the daughter of King Kamehmehanui Ailua of Maui.

Finally, please not that there are no contradictory genealogies to this story of Kalani Kaumehameha. So it is should be resolved and accepted by all who understand.

- Dean Kekoolani
February 2, 2010
Ewa-a-Laakona, O'ahu, Hawaii

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Haleki'i and Pihana Heiau
By Lyons Kapi'ioho Naone III
(EXCERPT)

It is believed that in 1790 Kamehameha I invoked his war god at Pihana after his defeat of Kalanikupuli's forces in Iao Valley(serum 1909:46). After this battle, Kamehameha sent for the Maui chiefess Kalani-Kauko'oluaole, a daughter of Kamehameha Nui, whom he believed had insulted him at Kaupo. Poloahilani, foster-sister of Kalani-Kauko'oluaole, was sent instead and sacrificed by Karnehameha at Pihana. She was the last sacrifice at Pihana.

Born at Pihana was Keopuolani, a chiefess of divine rank and descendant of the ruling chiefs of Maui and Hawaii. She became the wife of Kamehameha I and mother of Liholiho (Kamehameha II) and Kauikeaouli (Kamehameha III).

Pihana was demolished by Kalanimakamauali'i and Kauanaulu during Ka'ahumanu's proclamation in 1819 (Stokes, 1916)

The Wailuku area was a major gathering place and residential site of the Maui high chiefs and those of rank. The area from Waihe'e to Wailuku was the largest continuous area of wet taro cultivation in the Hawaiian Islands (Handy and Handy, 1972:496). To the southeast of Iao Stream, below Pihana Heiau, was Kauahea where warriors dwelt and were trained in war skills. This was a boxing site in the time of Kahekili.

------------------------------------------

FORANDER "AN ACCOUNT..." p338

We learn from Vancouver that at this time Kaheiheimalie, afterwards known as Hoapiliwahine, a younger sister of Kaahumanu, was still the wife of Kamehameha's brother, Kalaimamahu. Vancouver also mentions "a captive daughter of Kahekili," who was then residing at Kamehameha's court. The person referred to was either one of Kahekili's nieces and his sister Kalola's daughters, Kalaniakua or Liliha Kekuiapoiwa, or else Kalola's granddaughter, Keopuolani, which three ladies were brought from Molokai to Hawaii by Kamehameha after the death of Kalola, as related on page 238.

(NOTE: The captive chiefess is Kalanikauiokikilo, who refused to marry Kamehameha, escaped a death sentence, but remained trapped at his court as a VIP captive. She escaped by committing suicide. - DEAN KEKOOLANI)

They had the following children:

  M i Kalaniulumoku (Kalaniulumoku I, Kaulumoku I).

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