Kekoolani Genealogy of the Descendants of the Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii


Kahakuakane (Ka-haku-a-Kane) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4.(Mo'i, married 5 Manukaikoo (Manu-kai-ko'o).

Other marriages:
Kaponaenae,

Kahakuakane was the 10th Alii Aimoku of Kauai. He ruled as titular King or chief of Kauai. He was also known as Kahakuokane. He was born around 1480.

He was contemporary with the king Kakaa-laneo on Maui, with the king Kalonaiki on Oahu, and with king Kauholanuimahu of Hawaii

He was son of Kaumakamano and his wife Kapoinukai. Nothing remarkable has been remembered in the legends about Kahakuakane. Kahakuakane had two wives. With the first, named Manokaikoo, he had a son and successor called Kuwalupaukamoku. With the second wife, named Kaponaenae, he had two children called Kahekiliokane and Kuonamauaino. Kahekiliokane's granddaughter was sought for, and became the wife of Lono-a-Pii.

Though no legend or genealogy state explicitly who were the parents or ancestors of either of the two wives of Kahakuakane, yet, judging from their names, and guided by the prevalent custom in such cases among the Hawaiian chiefs, it is very probable that the first was a granddaughter of Manokalanipo, and thus a cousin to his husband, and that the second was a sister of Kahekili I of Maui, and daughter of Kakae and Kapohauola.
His son with Manokaikoo succeeded him.

References:
Abraham Fornander, An Account of the Polynesian Race: Its Origin and Migrations, Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Company, 1969.

Manukaikoo (Manu-kai-ko'o) 1, 2, 3, 4. married 5 Kahakuakane (Ka-haku-a-Kane) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai).

They had the following children:

  M i Kuwalupaukamoku (Ku-walu-pau-ka-moku) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai).

Kahakuakane (Ka-haku-a-Kane) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4.(Mo'i, married 5 Kaponaenae.

Other marriages:
Manukaikoo (Manu-kai-ko'o),

Kahakuakane was the 10th Alii Aimoku of Kauai. He ruled as titular King or chief of Kauai. He was also known as Kahakuokane. He was born around 1480.

He was contemporary with the king Kakaa-laneo on Maui, with the king Kalonaiki on Oahu, and with king Kauholanuimahu of Hawaii

He was son of Kaumakamano and his wife Kapoinukai. Nothing remarkable has been remembered in the legends about Kahakuakane. Kahakuakane had two wives. With the first, named Manokaikoo, he had a son and successor called Kuwalupaukamoku. With the second wife, named Kaponaenae, he had two children called Kahekiliokane and Kuonamauaino. Kahekiliokane's granddaughter was sought for, and became the wife of Lono-a-Pii.

Though no legend or genealogy state explicitly who were the parents or ancestors of either of the two wives of Kahakuakane, yet, judging from their names, and guided by the prevalent custom in such cases among the Hawaiian chiefs, it is very probable that the first was a granddaughter of Manokalanipo, and thus a cousin to his husband, and that the second was a sister of Kahekili I of Maui, and daughter of Kakae and Kapohauola.
His son with Manokaikoo succeeded him.

References:
Abraham Fornander, An Account of the Polynesian Race: Its Origin and Migrations, Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Company, 1969.

Kaponaenae 1. married 2 Kahakuakane (Ka-haku-a-Kane) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai).

They had the following children:

  M i Kahekiliokane 1.
  M ii Kuonamauaino 1.

Kaumakaamano (Kau-maka-a-Mano) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.(Mo'i, married 6 Kapoinukai (Kapo-inu-kai).

Kamakamano was the 9th Alii Aimoku of Kauai. He ruled as titular King or chief of Kauai. He was also known as Kaumaka-a-Mano. He was born around 1455.

He was son of Manokalanipo, 8th Alii Aimoku of Kauai, and Na'ekapulani. No special legend attaches to Kamaka-a-Mano, nor to his wife Kapoinukai. His son Kahakuakane by his wife Kapo'inukai succeeded him.

REF: Abraham Fornander, An Account of the Polynesian Race: Its Origin and Migrations, Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Company, 1969.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

FORNANDER:
"The wife of Manokalanipo was Naekapulani. What lineage she sprang from is not known with any certainty. She was probably of Kauai birth, and one legend calls her Naekapulani-a-Makalii, indicating that Makalii was her father ; and other legends speak of Makalii as a chief of Waimea, Kauai, though nothing is said whether he belonged to the Maweke-Moikeha line, or to that of Laamaiknhiki.l The children of Manokalanipo and his wife were Kaumaka-mano, Napuu-a-mano and Kahai-a-mano."

Kapoinukai (Kapo-inu-kai) 1, 2, 3, 4. married 5 Kaumakaamano (Kau-maka-a-Mano) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai).

They had the following children:

  M i Kahakuakane (Ka-haku-a-Kane) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai).

Manokalanipo (Mano-ka-lani-po) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4.(Mo'i, married 5 Naekapulani (Nae-kapu-lani).

Manokalanipo was the 8th Alii Aimoku of Kauai. He ruled as titular King or chief of Kauai. He was also known as Mano-ka-lani-po and was probably born around the year 1430. From him sprang forth the poetic name of Kauai, Kauai-a-Manokalanipo or shortened to Kauai-a-Mano translates to Kauai of Manokalanipo or Kauai of Mano.

He was the son of Kukona, 7th Alii Aimoku of Kauai and his wife Laupuapuamaa. In the war of Kawelewele Kauai fought against the combined forced of the other 6 island. His father, Kukona, had no intention to surrender nor to deliver his sovereignty to alien hands. When the armada of Kalaunui-Ohua, touched the shores of Kaua`i, they were met by an army of only 500 men who were the defenders of Kaua`i. The king, Kukona, had not even bothered to attend; he sent Mano-Kalanipo, to represent him. In one brief battle, the armies of invasion suffered a complete and absolute defeat. A small and greatly outnumbered force of Kaua`i warriors had decisively beaten the combined armies of all of the other islands.

Manokalanipo has the characteristic honour among the Hawaiians of having had his name affixed as a sobriquet to the island over which he ruled, and in epical and diplomatic language it was ever after known as Kauai-a-Manokalanipo. He was noted for the energy and wisdom with which he encouraged agriculture and industry, executed long and difficult works of irrigation, and thus brought fields of wilderness under cultivation. No foreign wars disturbed his reign, and it is remembered in the legends as the golden age the island of Kauai.

References:
Abraham Fornander, An Account of the Polynesian Race: Its Origin and Migrations, Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Company, 1969.

Naekapulani (Nae-kapu-lani) 1, 2, 3, 4. married 5 Manokalanipo (Mano-ka-lani-po) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai).

FORNANDER:
"The wife of Manokalanipo was Naekapulani. What lineage she sprang from is not known with any certainty. She was probably of Kauai birth, and one legend calls her Naekapulani-a-Makalii, indicating that Makalii was her father ; and other legends speak of Makalii as a chief of Waimea, Kauai, though nothing is said whether he belonged to the Maweke-Moikeha line, or to that of Laamaiknhiki.l The children of Manokalanipo and his wife were Kaumaka-mano, Napuu-a-mano and Kahai-a-mano."

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kamakau says she is the grandaughter of Maka-li'i of the heavens inland of Kapa'a in Kapahi on Kauai. This is Makaliinuikuakawaiea who was the Alii (Chief) of Kona, Kauai.
-DEAN KEKOOLANI (March 5, 2010)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

They had the following children:

  M i Kaumakaamano (Kau-maka-a-Mano) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai).
  M ii Napuu-a-mano (Na-punua-mano) 1.

FORNANDER:
"The wife of Manokalanipo was Naekapulani. What lineage she sprang from is not known with any certainty. She was probably of Kauai birth, and one legend calls her Naekapulani-a-Makalii, indicating that Makalii was her father ; and other legends speak of Makalii as a chief of Waimea, Kauai, though nothing is said whether he belonged to the Maweke-Moikeha line, or to that of Laamaiknhiki.l The children of Manokalanipo and his wife were Kaumaka-mano, Napuu-a-mano and Kahai-a-mano."
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Na-punua-mano is the name used by S.M. Kamakau in "Ruling Chiefs of Hawaii'.
  M iii Kaha'i (III) (Kahai-a-Mano) 1.

FORNANDER:
"The wife of Manokalanipo was Naekapulani. What lineage she sprang from is not known with any certainty. She was probably of Kauai birth, and one legend calls her Naekapulani-a-Makalii, indicating that Makalii was her father ; and other legends speak of Makalii as a chief of Waimea, Kauai, though nothing is said whether he belonged to the Maweke-Moikeha line, or to that of Laamaiknhiki.l The children of Manokalanipo and his wife were Kaumaka-mano, Napuu-a-mano and Kahai-a-mano."

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ABOUT THE NAME KAHAI (KAHA'I)

The original chief named Kahai was a famous explorer who traveled to Kahiki very early in the history of the Hawaiian chiefs. He was a hero to the Hawaiian chiefs and many of them called their sons by his name. So there are many chiefs whose names begin with or contain the name "Kahai".

But there are five chiefs who are known primarily as just "Kahai", beginning with the original Kahai. I have numbered these Kahai chiefs in the correct order by the time period in which they lived, based on their generational distance from Wakea, ancestor of all the chiefs. The name "Kahai" is often expressed "Kahai-moelea", being similar in relation to "John" and "Jonathan", and would "Kahai-moelea" be interchangeable with "Kahai" for all 5 of these chiefs.

The chiefs named Kahai are:

(1) KAHAI (I) "Kahai-a-Hema" was the son of Hema (k.) and Hinamaikehoa (Ulamakehoa, Luamahekoa) w.). Original Kahai who traveled to Kahiki. He is 31 generations from Wakea.

(2) KAHAI (II) "Kahai-a-Ho'onali'i" was the son of Ho'okamali'i (k.) and Keahiula (w.). He is 34 generations from Wakea and not closely related to the original Kahai before him, being his 18th cousin. The people of his time would have known of the original Kahai in living memory. This Kahai is from Kauai and his grandfather Moikeha was also voyaging chief like the original Kahai. Moikeha would have lived at about the same time as the original Kahai as well.

(3) KAHAI (III) "Kahai-a-Mano" was one of the sons of Manokalanipo (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai). He is 52 generations from Wakea. He is not closely related to the previous Kahai II, being his 18th cousin, 19 times removed. He is more closely related to the original Kahai I, being from the same family lineage, being this original Kahai's 1st cousin, 19 times removed.

(4) KAHAI (IV) called "Kahaimoeleaikaaikupou" or "Kahaimoeleaikaaikapukupou" was the son of Kalapana (Kalapana Kuioiomoa) (k.) and Makeamakaimalanahae (Maemalamaihanai) (w.). He is 60 generations from Wakea. His relation to the previous Kahai III is very, very distant (22nd cousins, 8 times removed). However, he is a direct descendant of the original Kahai (Kahai-a-Hema), being his 27th great grandson.

(5) KAHAI (V) "Kahai-a-Keeaumoku", was the son of the original Keeaumoku Nui (Keeaumoku I) and the grandson of King Kekaulikeikekahialiiokamokamoku. He is 73 generations from Wakea. He is from the same family lineage as the original Kahai, being his 1st cousin, 33 times removed.


DEAN KEKOOLANI
February 1, 2010
Kapolei, O'ahu, Hawaii

Kukona (Kukona II, Kukona-a-Luanuu) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai) [Parents] 1, 2, 3.(Mo'i, married Laupuapuamaa (Lau-puapua-ma'a).

Kukona was the 7th Alii Aimoku of Kauai. He ruled as the titular king or chief of the island of Kaua’i. Kukona took Ka-lau-nui-ohua, the ambitious chief of Hawaii who tried to seize Kauai, as prisoner to Kauai and this war was known as the War of Kawelewele.

Laupuapuamaa (Lau-puapua-ma'a) 1, 2, 3. married Kukona (Kukona II, Kukona-a-Luanuu) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai).

They had the following children:

  M i Manokalanipo (Mano-ka-lani-po) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai).

Lu'anu'u (Lu'anu'u III, Luanuu-a-Kamahano) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai) [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born about 1560 in (Ulu-Hema Genealogy, Big Island). He married 4 Kalanimoeikawaikai (Kalanimoewaiku, Kalanamowaiku, Kalanimoeikawaikaa).

There are 3 chiefs and one royal prince named Lu'anu'u:

(1) LU'ANU'U I, son of Lukahakono - 15 generations after Wakea
(2) LU'ANU'U II, son of Laka (Laka-noho-i-ka-wehiwehi, Lakaimihau) - 33 generations after Wakea
(3) LU'ANU'U III, son of Kamahana - 48 generations after Wakea

The grandson of Kamehameha the Great is H.R.H. Prince Kahalaia Luanu'u. Technically this royal prince would be Chief Lu'anuu IV.

Kalanimoeikawaikai (Kalanimoewaiku, Kalanamowaiku, Kalanimoeikawaikaa) 1, 2, 3, 4 was born about 1560 in (Ulu-Hema Genealogy, Big Island). She married 5 Lu'anu'u (Lu'anu'u III, Luanuu-a-Kamahano) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai).

Other marriages:
Nawele,
Makalae,

They had the following children:

  M i Kukona (Kukona II, Kukona-a-Luanuu) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai).

Kamahano (Kama-hano) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai) [Parents] 1, 2, 3.(Mo'i, married Kaaueanui-o-kalani (Ka'auea-nui-o-ka-lani).

Kaaueanui-o-kalani (Ka'auea-nui-o-ka-lani) 1, 2, 3. married Kamahano (Kama-hano) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai).

They had the following children:

  M i Lu'anu'u (Lu'anu'u III, Luanuu-a-Kamahano) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai) was born about 1560.

Nawele [Parents]. married Kalanimoeikawaikai (Kalanimoewaiku, Kalanamowaiku, Kalanimoeikawaikaa).

Kalanimoeikawaikai (Kalanimoewaiku, Kalanamowaiku, Kalanimoeikawaikaa) 1, 2, 3, 4 was born about 1560 in (Ulu-Hema Genealogy, Big Island). She married Nawele.

Other marriages:
Lu'anu'u (Lu'anu'u III, Luanuu-a-Kamahano), (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai)
Makalae,

They had the following children:

  M i Lakona was born about 1340.

Ahukini-a-Laa (Ahu-kini-a-Laa) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.(Mo'i, married Haikamaio (Ha'i-ka-ma'i'o).

Haikamaio (Ha'i-ka-ma'i'o) 1, 2, 3. married Ahukini-a-Laa (Ahu-kini-a-Laa) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai).

FORNANDER:
Of Ahukini-a-Laa no legend remains. His wife was Hai-a-Kamaio, granddaughter of Luaehu, one of the southern emigrant chiefs during the previous period. Their son was Kamuhano, of whom nothing also is known, except that his wife's name was Kaaueanuiokadani, of unknown descent, and that their son was Luanuu. Equally curt notice remains of the reign of Luanuu.

They had the following children:

  M i Kamahano (Kama-hano) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai).

Laamaikahiki (La'a-mai-Kahiki, La'a) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai) [Parents] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.(Mo'i, married Waolena (Wao-lena).

Other marriages:
Hoakamaikapuaihelu (Hoaka-mai-kapu'ai-helu, Hoakamaikapuaihele),
Manoopupaipai (Mano-'opu-pa'ipa'i, Mano),
Halaula,

La'a was called "La'a-mai-Kahiki" because he came to Hawaii from Kahiki.

Waolena (Wao-lena) 1, 2, 3, 4. married Laamaikahiki (La'a-mai-Kahiki, La'a) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai).

They had the following children:

  M i Ahukini-a-Laa (Ahu-kini-a-Laa) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Kauai).

Home First Previous Next Last

Surname List | Name Index